Ride Horse Trails in Northern Wisconsin

A bridle path, also called a bridleway, equestrian trail, horse riding path, bridle road, or horse trail, is a trail or a thoroughfare that is used by people riding on horses, though such trails often now serve a wider range of users, including equestrians, hikers, and cyclists.

Trail riding is riding outdoors on trails, bridle paths, and forest roads, but not on roads regularly used by motorised traffic. A trail ride can be of any length, including a long distance, multi-day trip. It originated with horse riding, and in North America, the equestrian form is usually called “trail riding,” or, less often “hacking.” In the UK and Europe, the practice is usually called horse or pony trekking.




Cross Country Ski Northern Wisconsin Trails

Cross-country skiing: the sport of skiing across the countryside, often through woods and usually on relatively flat terrain, using narrow skis with boots that can be raised off the ski at the heel when striding.

Cross-country skiing is a form of skiing where skiers rely on their own locomotion to move across snow-covered terrain, rather than using ski lifts or other forms of assistance. Cross-country skiing is widely practiced as a sport and recreational activity; however, some still use it as a means of transportation. Variants of cross-country skiing are adapted to a range of terrain which spans unimproved, sometimes mountainous terrain to groomed courses that are specifically designed for the sport.

Snowshoe Trails in Northern Wisconsin

Snowshoeing: the activity of taking part in cross-country walks over snow. Snowshoeing is centuries old and was invented for easier travel on snow. Snowshoe: a contrivance that may be attached to the foot to enable the wearer to walk on deep snow without sinking, especially a light, racket-shaped frame across which is stretched a network of rawhide.




Sled Dog trails in Northern Wisconsin

Sled dog: a dog (such as a husky or malamute) trained to draw a usually heavy sled typically with other dogs over snow-covered terrain , Sled dogs were originally used in colder regions (as of northern Canada, Alaska, Greenland, and Antarctica) as work dogs to facilitate travel and transport of supplies but are now popularly used elsewhere during the winter especially for racing. >Sled dogs were important for transportation in arctic areas, hauling supplies in areas that were inaccessible by other methods. They were used with varying success in the explorations of both poles, as well as during the Alaskan gold rush. Sled dog teams delivered mail to rural communities in Alaska and northern Canada. Sled dogs today are still used by some rural communities, especially in areas of Alaska and Canada and throughout Greenland. They are used for recreational purposes and racing events, such as the Iditarod Trail and the Yukon Quest.

Dogsled racing, also called sled dog racing, sport of racing sleds pulled by dogs, usually over snow-covered cross-country courses. In warmer climates, wheeled carts are substituted for the sleds. Dogsledding was developed from a principal Eskimo method of transportation. The gold rushes in Alaska and the Yukon Territory (now Yukon) at the turn of the 20th century brought greater global attention to sled dogs, which were used at that time for freight hauling and mail delivery, as well as by fur trappers to travel between their traps. At first dogs were individually tethered to the sled in a fan hitch. This was ideal in open country, but, as the use of sled dogs expanded, the tandem hitch, for running dogs in pairs, became the standard. Sled dogs are still used for transportation and working purposes in some Arctic and subarctic areas, though they have largely been replaced by aircraft and snowmobiles. Most dog teams today are kept for recreation or racing rather than for working.